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Sally Haldorson's job as 800-CEO-READ’s General Manager is to make 800-CEO-READ a great place to work for our employees, and a consistently high-performing customer service organization for our clients, authors, and our partners in the publishing industry. In addition to her General Manager duties ensuring collaboration, integration, and quality, she reads, writes, reviews, curates, and edits for the company. Helping craft The 100 Best Business Books of All Time used parts of both skill sets. Outside of work, she is most likely to be found hitting a tennis ball around or hanging out with her boys (husband, child, dog) at home.

Viewing all articles by Sally Haldorson


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To Be or Not to Be...Creative

By Sally Haldorson, published August 31, 2011, at 3:31 PM – Filed under: Innovation & Creativity

A friend posted on Facebook a link to this article, with the somewhat obvious title, "People are biased against creative ideas, studies find," and it's contents have stuck with me all week. It comes from a website called PhysOrg which I've never heard of despite having a science geek for a husband. PhysOrg's mission as described on it's website is "to provide the most complete and comprehensive daily coverage of the full sweep of science, technology, and medicine news.

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Icon + Icon, Intertwined

By Sally Haldorson, published August 26, 2011, at 1:31 PM – Filed under: Management & Workplace Culture

I typed my first high school papers, my first non-hand-written stories, on an electric typewriter--a hand-me-down from a cousin--on the floor of my childhood bedroom. But when I got to college, there was a bank of Apple IIe computers in the dorm's lab and over the years I often spent all night in the company of those small white boxes, a happy computer face greeting me each time I came back from the cafeteria full and ready to settle back down to the grind of churning out the multitude of 10-20 page papers required for every class every term. Entering grad school, I bought a Macintosh Performa so that I could write my stories and more of those papers at my apartment while eating ramen noodles.

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The Myth of Work-Life Balance

By Sally Haldorson, published August 22, 2011, at 12:58 PM – Filed under: Management & Workplace Culture

When was the first time you heard that phrase: work-life balance? Initially, I remember it coming up primarily in discussions about women and the tough choices they make to balance their responsibilities and desires as mothers with the demands of their careers. So maybe the early 1990s?

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O is for Optimism

By Sally Haldorson, published August 17, 2011, at 4:00 PM – Filed under: Management & Workplace Culture

"D" words are being used quite liberally these days. Double Dip. Dollar.

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This week on inBubbleWrap!

By Sally Haldorson, published August 12, 2011, at 5:38 PM – Filed under: Management & Workplace Culture

The Right Fight by Saj-Nicole Joni and Damon Beyer, Harper, 234 pages, $26. 99, Hardcover, 2010, ISBN 9780061717161 The most common metaphor for alignment within a company, it seems, refers to everyone needing to pull on the same oars. Authors Saj-Nicole Joni and Damon Beyer, in their book, The Right Fight, define this nautically-tinged tenet with a bit more specificity than I just did: "To accomplish anything, the logic goes, employees must agree about the mission, strategy, and goals of an organization.

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The Possibility of Language

By Sally Haldorson, published August 10, 2011, at 4:54 PM – Filed under: Management & Workplace Culture

Today, Pulitzer Prize winner Philip Levine was named the new poet laureate of the United States. NPR's story on Levine describes his work this way: "Born in Detroit in 1928, Levine has used his poetry to examine blue-collar life, often embroidering everyday events with a sense of myth. " He has been described as the "Whitman of the industrial heartland" and commonly as 'the working man's poet'.

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How Did They Do It?

By Sally Haldorson, published August 5, 2011, at 2:06 PM – Filed under: Management & Workplace Culture

In our The 100 Best Business Books of All Time, we included a chapter of recommended biographies. Jack has always championed the form as a valid way to learn valuable business lessons, not just as good entertainment. In the opening of the chapter, we explained: How did they do it?

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Business Beach Reads?

By Sally Haldorson, published July 21, 2011, at 5:00 PM – Filed under: Management & Workplace Culture

We try to keep most of our recommendations oriented around business reading, but we do get an eclectic selection of books sent to us. Since I'm about to take a few days of stay-cation, it seemed just the right time to suggest this multifarious collection of reads appropriate for hot summer days. These books may not spark a change revolution in your company or inspire the perfect new product to rush into development, but, they will entertain you and make you think--just a little, but not too much, because after all, it is vacation.

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To Lead is to Teach

By Sally Haldorson, published July 11, 2011, at 2:46 PM – Filed under: Management & Workplace Culture

Back in January, we were sent a manuscript for a new book in the Notes On Series created by Russell Reich. Jack wrote a JCS on the first book in the series, Notes on Directing, and has been enthusiastically following Reich and his impressive accomplishments ever since. When Jack received this new manuscript for Notes on Teaching, written by Shellee Hendricks and Reich, he forwarded it on to me.

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The Bear Basics

By Sally Haldorson, published June 29, 2011, at 2:14 PM – Filed under: Management & Workplace Culture

Of all childhood characters, Winnie-the-Pooh has always been a favorite. The best banana bread recipe I make is straight out of one of the many collectible Pooh books I once owned: Winnie-the-Pooh's Teatime Cookbook. The first storybook I bought my son was The Complete Tales of Winnie-the-Pooh.

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Women in Business(books)

By Sally Haldorson, published June 22, 2011, at 7:19 PM – Filed under: Management & Workplace Culture

As I (and many others) have noted, women business book authors make up a very small percentage of the category, and while the number is growing, often books by women are more niche-oriented or geared toward the personal, so don't get the powerful push or word-of-mouth that more general business books get. So I'd like to spend a little time talking about the books written by women that have landed on my desk recently: This spring, Anne Kreamer's book, It's Always Personal, first intrigued me--no, touched me--due to the personalized publisher copy being used to promote the book. Kreamer wrote: I was told when I started work that if I wanted to be professional, I should never let my feelings show at work--that emotion had nothing to do with success.

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Interview Unearthed

By Sally Haldorson, published April 13, 2011, at 8:03 AM – Filed under: Management & Workplace Culture

GoogleAlerts shared a little surprise with us this morning. An interview Jack and Todd did with Michael Bungay Stanier "back in the day" when The 100 Best Business Books of All Time was just a newborn was put up on Stanier's (great-looking) Great Work Interviews site. In this interview, Jack, Todd, and Michael talk about: A big aha!