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Editor's Choice Rss





Messy

Messy: The Power of Disorder to Transform Our Lives

By Dylan Schleicher, published October 27, 2016, at 3:15 PM – Filed under: Innovation & Creativity, Leadership & Strategy, Personal Development & Human Behavior

Tim Harford explains how embracing the mess, in our lives and ourselves, makes us more creative and productive as individuals, and helps us build more smart and resilient organizations and societies.

Earningit

Earning It: Hard-Won Lessons from Trailblazing Women at the Top of the Business World

By Dylan Schleicher, published October 20, 2016, at 1:45 PM – Filed under: Leadership & Strategy

Veteran journalist Joann S. Lublin has documented a generation of women leaders that have changed the face of business, and the challenges women still face on a daily basis in business.

Manwhoknew

The Man Who Knew: The Life and Times of Alan Greenspan

By Dylan Schleicher, published October 14, 2016, at 12:00 PM – Filed under:

Sebastian Mallaby has written a complete portrait of the most important and influential economic statesmen of our time.

Competingagainstluck

Competing Against Luck: The Story of Innovation and Customer Choice

By Dylan Schleicher, published October 7, 2016, at 11:15 AM – Filed under: Innovation & Creativity, Leadership & Strategy

Clayton Christensen changed the world of business with his theory of disruptive innovation. His “Theory of Jobs to Be Done” may be even bigger.

Emotionalagility

Emotional Agility: Get Unstuck, Embrace Change, and Thrive in Work and Life

By Dylan Schleicher, published September 29, 2016, at 3:00 PM – Filed under:

Susan David has written a beautiful book about the power of embracing the full spectrum of our emotional lives.

Simplybrilliant

Simply Brilliant: How Great Organizations Do Ordinary Things in Extraordinary Ways

By Dylan Schleicher, published September 22, 2016, at 2:45 PM – Filed under: Current Events & Public Affairs, Innovation & Creativity, Leadership & Strategy, Management & Workplace Culture, Personal Development & Human Behavior

Bill Taylor, founder of Fast Company, reminds us that creativity exists outside of Silicon Valley, and is available to all of us.

Managinggray

Managing In the Gray: Five Timeless Questions for Resolving Your Toughest Problems at Work

By Dylan Schleicher, published September 16, 2016, at 11:00 AM – Filed under: Leadership & Strategy

Joseph Badaracco has written a great guide to management that reminds us of its moral imperative and importance.

Utopiacreepy

Utopia is Creepy: And Other Provocations

By Dylan Schleicher, published September 8, 2016, at 12:30 PM – Filed under: Innovation & Creativity

Nicholas Carr reminds us that digital utopianism is just like all the utopias that came before it—unrealistic and a little creepy.

Pre suasion

Pre-Suasion: A Revolutionary Way to Influence and Persuade

By Dylan Schleicher, published September 1, 2016, at 2:15 PM – Filed under: Big Ideas & New Perspectives, Leadership & Strategy, Management & Workplace Culture, Marketing & Sales

Robert Cialdini is back more than thirty years after his classic, Influence, with a new book on the topic from another

Scrappy

Scrappy: A Little Book about Choosing to Play Big

By Dylan Schleicher, published August 25, 2016, at 2:00 PM – Filed under: Biography & Narrative, Innovation & Creativity, Leadership & Strategy, Personal Development & Human Behavior

In her new book, Terri Sjodin helps us stop making excuses and start getting scrappy in pursuit of our goals.

Stopspending

Stop Spending, Start Managing: Strategies to Transform Wasteful Habits

By Dylan Schleicher, published August 18, 2016, at 1:00 PM – Filed under: Leadership & Strategy

Tanya Menon & Leigh Thompson offer counterintuitive and sometimes unconventional wisdom to help leaders invest their time, effort, and money in the right places.

Leadershipheadlines

Leadership in the Headlines: Insider Insights Into How Leaders Lead

By Dylan Schleicher, published August 11, 2016, at 9:15 AM – Filed under: Leadership & Strategy

Andrew Hill's new book is a great blend of perspective and prescription that ends up much more than a sum of its parts.