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October 12, 2004

News & Opinion: Gracious Exits/Not Burning Bridges

By: Dylan Schleicher @ 1:29 PM – Filed under: Management & Workplace Culture

How we leave is as important as how we enter--- be it an interview, a job, a meeting, a business opportunity or party. People who create their own luck most often leave with grace ... so that there are no hard feellings and the potential reconnection is easier in the future.
So often it is just easier to blow up and blow off a situation or person that is uncomfortable and gives us agata. While that may work in some cases, building a career or business, friendship or any relationship requires more self-control. People who have their opportunities turn into success often benefit from good behavior. They can come back for a reference, serve on a community board together and forge a new relationship. Ex spouses do that more often than we think or hear because they put their kids first. They, their children and their extended families benefit.
Why not just cut people off and move on? The answer is the theme of How To Create Your Own Luck... because, as we have often been advised by those who are calmer and wiser and maybe even older, 'you just never know'!
David Bach, a long time colleague, and author of the Smart Women Finish Rich series and the New York Times Bestseller, Automatic Millionaire, read the first chapter of my book that addresses this trait of "lucky" people.
He writes, " I feel lucky to have read this book because one little paragraph (on gracious exits) saved me from ruining a major business relationship."
David reassessed the situation, revisited his options and chose the one that did not burn a bridge.
Saving relationships is a trait of people who create their own luck. Why is it worth the effort? You never know what the future holds.

About Dylan Schleicher


Dylan Schleicher has been a part of the 800-CEO-READ claque since 2003. Even though he's stayed on at the company, he has not stayed put. After beginning in shipping & receiving, he joined customer service and accounting before moving into his current, highly elliptical orbit of duties overseeing the ChangeThis and In the Books websites, the company's annual review of books and in-house design. He lives with his wife and two children in the Washington Heights neighborhood on Milwaukee's West Side.