Advertisement

July 1, 2010

News & Opinion: Inc.Live

By: Dylan Schleicher @ 5:09 PM – Filed under: Leadership & Strategy

Innovation is a word that gets thrown around a lot in business and business writing, but in can be hard to catch—to understand and implement—in your daily operations. It's like a knuckle ball... hard to deliver (only a few people seem to really master it at any given time) and you never know where it's going to go next. Bob Ueker famously said that "The way to catch a knuckle ball is to wait until it stops rolling and then pick it up." The problem with innovation is that it never stops rolling—it's not going to stop for you to pick it up. If you're in business, you either have to create it or follow along as closely as possible.
And, if that sounds like you, our friends over at Inc. Magazine have an ongoing series of live chats that I hope you're keeping up with. These chats have gleaned great insights from the likes of Jake Nickell, co-founder of Threadless, and Graham Hill, the founder of TreeHugger. If you enjoyed Rework (which if you read, you did), you'll love the live-chat with its author, 37signals founder Jason Fried.

In the month of June alone, they had Tony Hsieh, CEO of Zappos and author of Delivering Happiness, and Mark Frauenfelder, editor-in-chief of Make Magazine, co-founder of Boing Boing and author of Made by Hand.

With its live-chats, Inc. is doing something innovative itself, offering you a chance to pose your own questions to some of the brightest minds in business today. So stay tuned and join in...
they have three more live-chats scheduled in the near future.

About Dylan Schleicher


Dylan Schleicher has been a part of the 800-CEO-READ claque since 2003. Even though he's stayed on at the company, he has not stayed put. After beginning in shipping & receiving, he joined customer service and accounting before moving into his current, highly elliptical orbit of duties overseeing the ChangeThis and In the Books websites, the company's annual review of books and in-house design. He lives with his wife and two children in the Washington Heights neighborhood on Milwaukee's West Side.