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November 18, 2010

Excerpts: A Guest Post from Pinkett and Robinson

By: Dylan Schleicher @ 6:34 PM – Filed under: Personal Development & Human Behavior

Randall Pinkett was the winner of season four of The Apprentice, and the show's first minority winner. Rather awkwardly, after he was "hired," he was also the only winner ever asked by "The Donald" to share his victory with the runner-up. Not a fan of the show, I didn't know of those events until I picked up Dr. Pinkett's recently released Black Faces in White Places, but I became a quick fan of Pinkett the first time I sat down with his book. It was coauthored by Jeffrey Robinson (with editor Philana Patterson) and published by Amacon (the imprint of the American Management Association), and it quickly begins tackling the issue(s) of race in America—straightforwardly and without flinching.
But that is not the what the book is really about. It is a book about success. The authors take on the issue of race because it still is an issue—and it's of central importance to accurately determine how the dynamics differ for African-Americans as they move throughout a career, and how that affects their possible success. By approaching the topic openly and honestly, Pinkett and Robinson are able to discuss how to achieve greatness and create a powerful, lasting legacy by learning, playing, mastering and redefining "the game." In doing so, they uncover and describe (as the subtitle of the book suggests) "10 game-changing strategies," which they were kind enough to summarize and share with us in the post below.

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Ten Game-Changing Strategies to Achieve Success and Find Greatness
BY RANDALL PINKETT & JEFFREY ROBINSON


1. Establish a strong identity and purpose. Your ethnic and cultural identity is a great asset. Amplify it as a competitive advantage. A strong identity reflects an appreciation of your uniqueness and its value. A strong identity grounds you; a well-defined purpose gives you the self-confidence to know you can choose your own path, rather than follow society. Start by asking yourself, "What does it mean to be Black or African American?"

2. Obtain broad exposure. Seek out different experiences, perspectives, places, and people that bring about a healthy level of discomfort. Moving beyond your comfort zone will expand your worldview and sense of possibilities, contribute to how you construct your identity and define your purpose, and enable you to develop and grow.

3. Demonstrate excellence. Being good at what you do is not enough. You must be excellent. Achieving excellence takes combining the gifts and passion you naturally possess with discipline (the time, effort, and hard work you are willing to put forth) and your beliefs (the translation of your thoughts into empowering actions and outcomes).

4. Build diverse and solid relationships. Historically, African Americans have had to adapt to the codes of the white majority. But in a global marketplace and a United States where minorities are the majority, code switching encompasses a wide array of standards and norms. Reach out and network with the aim of creating a culture where everyone sees the value in learning more about one another.

5. Seek the wisdom of others. There is always something you can learn from others, whether younger, older, less experienced, or more capable. Learn from others' mistakes as well as their successes. When you seek the wisdom of others, you develop your own. Learn from your peers. Find a mentor, and be one, too. The best way to learn is to teach.

6. Find strength in numbers. Surround yourself with people who share your perspective, affirm your values, and support your goals. Cultivate an inner circle whose members are all comfortable with each other, trust each other, and watch out for each other. (The key isn't necessarily ethnicity, but compatibility.) Get involved in collaborative organizations, which range from Black Greek-lettered fraternities and sororities to the NAACP.

7. Think and act intrapreneurially. Apply an entrepreneurial mindset within an established organization to effect institutional change. You must maintain a strong sense of self-determination and work within the system to make a big impact.

8. Think and act entrepreneurially. You must take control of your career; you must dare to be in the driver's seat of your destiny; and you must be in a position to pursue your economic prosperity. The entrepreneurial mindset of passion, creativity, resourcefulness, courage, and resilience is mandatory for success in the twenty-first century. Work outside the system to build wealth for yourself and the community as a whole.

9. Synergize and reach scale. To redefine the game you must create mutually beneficial connections between people and between organizations to fulfill their collective purpose -- and then amplify their collaborative actions to have the broadest or deepest possible impact in a way that levels the playing field for everyone.

10. Give back generously. Each and every one of us represents the continuation of a countless number of legacies and we can blaze trails for others to follow. Today, African-American giving is no longer only about survival or even helping each other; it is about empowerment and collective self-determination. To address the many challenges in our community, we must leverage our combined efforts through organizations and businesses to reach as many people as possible.

Copyright © 2010 Randal Pinkett & Jeffrey Robinson, authors of Black Faces in White Places: 10 Game-Changing Strategies to Achieve Success and Find Greatness

AUTHOR BIOS Randal Pinkett, Ph.D., was the winner of season four of The Apprentice and the show's first minority winner. He is the co-founder, chairman, and CEO of BCT Partners, an information technology and management consulting firm. Dr. Pinkett is based in Somerset, New Jersey.

For more information please visit www.randalpinkett.com and follow the author on Facebook and Twitter.

Jeffrey Robinson, Ph.D., is a leading business scholar at Rutgers Business School and lives in Piscataway, New Jersey.

About Dylan Schleicher


Dylan Schleicher has been a part of the 800-CEO-READ claque since 2003. Even though he's stayed on at the company, he has not stayed put. After beginning in shipping & receiving, he joined customer service and accounting before moving into his current, highly elliptical orbit of duties overseeing the ChangeThis and In the Books websites, the company's annual review of books and in-house design. He lives with his wife and two children in the Washington Heights neighborhood on Milwaukee's West Side.